Friday Feldenkrais: Poems for My Students (read January 27, 2017)

The readings at the beginning of class on January 27, 2017 come from a section of Songlines, by Bruce Chatwin, in which Chatwin shared a collection of poems and quotes that elevated the wandering he found himself drawn to so deeply. 

Above all, do not lose your desire to walk: every day I walk myself into a state of well-being and walk away from every illness; I have walked myself into my best thoughts, and I know of no thought so burdensome that one cannot walk away from it . . . but by sitting still, and the more one sits still, the closer one comes to feeling ill . . . Thus if one just keeps on walking, everything will be all right. Soren Kierkegaard, letter to Jette (1847)

There was also this gem, my favorite in Songlines

Solvitur ambulando. "It is solved by walking."

Friday Feldenkrais: Poems for My Students (read January 20, 2017)

In Portland, Oregon, we experienced an ice storm in early January. Then, our January 13 class was canceled due to snow. When we had finally dug out and the snow melted, we began our eleventh season of the Friday Feldenkrais® classes in NE Portland on January 20, 2017 with this poem by Hafez. 

We Have Not Come To Take Prisoners

We have not come here to take prisoners,
But to surrender ever more deeply
To freedom and joy.

We have not come into this exquisite world
To hold ourselves hostage from love.

Run my dear,
From anything
That may not strengthen
Your precious budding wings.

Run like hell my dear,
From anyone likely
To put a sharp knife
Into the sacred, tender vision
Of your beautiful heart.

We have a duty to befriend
Those aspects of obedience
That stand outside of our house
And shout to our reason
"O please, O please,
Come out and play."

For we have not come here to take prisoners
Or to confine our wondrous spirits,

But to experience ever and ever more deeply
Our divine courage, freedom and
Light!

~ Hafiz ~

December Feldenkrais: Winding Down

This month brings the last three weeks of classes in 2016. We're focusing on the neck and jaw in a way that helps integrate movements of those areas with the rest of the self. 

There will be no class the last Tuesday or Friday of December. We will also not have class the first Friday of January. You can follow the calendar and keep up to date on No Class days and cancellations (infrequent, only in case I was sick and couldn't get a sub). 

Here's the link to the Classes page with the Google Calendar. 

In January, there will be no Tuesday class as I taking a couple days a week to work on my book of tales for stepmothers. Of course, there's a little Feldenkrais sprinkled in there, how could there not be? I'll see how my schedule looks from month to month and consider offering some special intensives as I've done in the past, 3-hour immersions that allow you to have a full morning of movement lessons. Of course, I'll continue to see private clients, you can book online here

Thank you for being with me this last year. What a great bit of discovery we've shared, of the individual self and of the self in a group. Moshe Feldenkrais was serious about his teaching people to overcome compulsions, the ultimate way of knowing if change had occurred was in how one was able to participate in relationships with self and with the environment. That is what we've shifted and grown over the year(s). May we carry on with that in 2017. 

My best to you, 

Kim

Neck and Jaw Comfort: Easing Out of 2016

Neck and Jaw Comfort: Easing Out of 2016

The final Feldenkrais class series of 2016 begins this week. We'll bring our focus to the comfort of the neck and jaw, the actions of which can influence the comfort and posture of the entire body. 

Posture: A Week in the Life of a Feldenkrais Practitioner (10/9/2016)

Posture: A Week in the Life of a Feldenkrais Practitioner (10/9/2016)

To be clear, good posture isn’t standing at attention or over-arching into a shoulders back position. Good posture is being able to stand poised, ready to move in any direction, at any time, and without a lot of effort. Tennis players have that ability. Dancers have it. Gymnasts too.